User log in
User registration
Registrations are closed. If you have an invitation code, click here
Username:  
Password: lost pass?
   
Details for Thomas Sowell - Applied Economics & Economic Facts and F
Created by Ratio: 4.18fsdsob 4 years ago
Audio Books : Educational : Other quality : English
Applied Economics: Thinking Beyond Stage One
Edition: Unabridged
by Thomas Sowell
read by Brian Emerson
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Subject(s): Business Nonfiction
Number of parts: 7
Duration: 7 hours, 47 minutes
ISBN: 0786153245
Release date: Sep 05, 2006


Description
Many of today’s economic issues are obscured by their inherent complexity and the often confusing and conflicting views coming from political talking heads. Sowell, a leading conservative economist and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, seeks to alleviate this confusion. He begins by elucidating the differences between politicians, who are often compelled by political considerations to act for the short term, and economists, who are more concerned with long term ramifications. Sowell then focuses on the application of economics to major contemporary real world problems—housing, medical care, discrimination, and the economic development of nations.

Sowell’s audience is the average citizen with little or no economics background who would like the tools to think critically about economic issues.

About the Author
Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and the recipient of many awards and prizes. His previous books for Blackstone Audiobooks include: Ethnic America, Civil Rights: Rhetoric or Reality, A Personal Odyssey, The Economics and Politics of Race, Black Rednecks and White Liberals, and many others.

Synopsis

From one of America’s most distinguished economists, a short, brilliant, and revelatory book: the fundamental ideas people most commonly get wrong about economics, and how to think about the subject better
Publishers Weekly

The heart of the matter for Thomas Sowell (Basic Economics) is to ask, "What are the facts?" In his latest book, economist Sowell examines numerous misconceptions about life and economics. Sowell writes like an exacting scholar, but his arguments, which rely on economic analyses primarily, may suffer from oversimplification. Sowell argues that zoning restrictions and rent-control policies hurt those whom they're meant to help; intones that women earn less than men because they are far less likely than men to choose occupations that require very long hours; believes tenure helps neither students nor professors; demonstrates that even the poor have successfully moved up economically; tackles fallacies about race in America; and aims to convince that "there is nothing baffling or morally wrong about the fact that different nations have different per capita incomes." He falters in his chapter on the academy, when he becomes an advocate rather than an observer, and oddly neglects the individual choice available to students. Sowell's purpose is to teach readers to "examine [their] beliefs more closely and more analytically," and the conclusions he draws are certain to inspire rigorous debate. This readable volume is a useful primer exposing how economics relates to the social issues that affect our country. (Jan.)
Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

More Reviews and Recommendations
Biography

Thomas Sowell has taught economics at a number of colleges and universities, including Cornell, University of California Los Angeles, and Amherst. He has published both scholarly and popular articles and books on economics, and is currently a scholar in residence at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
Customer Reviews

* Reader Rating:
* Ratings: 5Reviews: 1


Economic Facts and Fallacies by Anonymous

Reader Rating:


August 31, 2008: I would strongly recommend Economic Facts and Fallacies by Thomas Sowell to any person interested in sociology and logical fallacy. It is deliciously ironic that Sowell sets out to debunk economic fallacies primarily by employing a diverse lot of logical fallacies. The comparison to Monty Pythons Theory on Brontosauruses is made due to Sowell's lack of ability to 'or perhaps simply choosing not to' provide any alternative theories of his own in place of his so called 'fallacies', at least none more compelling then dinosaurs being pointy at one end, rather thicker in the middle and then narrowing down again at the other. The Theory of Intelligent Design is brought about because Mr. Sowell seems to believe, like the ID crowd, that simply by finding fault in one explanation 'the fossil record has gaps, the median age of black Americans is lower then whites' the remaining argument is proven false. Two of my favorite examples from the book are his discussion of race riots following the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 and his explanation of why employers didn't hire females into the work force due to their potential to disrupt productivity. Surely an author as knowledgeable as Mr. Sowell would be aware that there was a tremendous amount of discord and anger prior to 1965 and that it was because of this that the Voting Rights Act 'over much strenuous objection' was brought about. It is an egregious misuse of logical cause and effect to suggest that passage of the Act caused the riots or even to suggest that passage of the Act prior to the riots extinguished the claim that poverty, unemployment and racial discrimination where among the root causes. Turning to Mr. Sowell's treatment of Male-Female Facts and his suggestion that one of the current causes of female underpayment is because in years past 'the distraction of a female worker in their 'the mens' midst could adversely affect productivity, even if the woman herself was just as productive as the men' is simply pandering. Yes, in a kindergarten class this might be a plausble argument, 'cooties are real' but give American Industry some credit. Even 50 or 80 years ago industry and agriculture were run by adults. There didn't seem to be any problem having women building planes and tanks during the 40's. In short, I find this book to be an excellent example of Clarance Thomasism 'I got mine so you should be able to get yours too' and if read as such will prove enlightening. I strongly recommend a companion book, Nonsense: A Handbook of Logical Fallacies by Robert Gula as a companion read. The two fit together like hand in glove.


From the Publisher

Economic Facts and Fallacies exposes some of the most popular fallacies about economic issues-and does so in a lively manner and without requiring any prior knowledge of economics by the reader. These include many beliefs widely disseminated in the media and by politicians, such as mistaken ideas about urban problems, income differences, male-female economic differences, as well as economics fallacies about academia, about race, and about Third World countries. One of the themes of Economic Facts and Fallacies is that fallacies are not simply crazy ideas but in fact have a certain plausibility that gives them their staying power-and makes careful examination of their flaws both necessary and important, as well as sometimes humorous. Written in the easy-to-follow style of the author’s Basic Economics, this latest book is able to go into greater depth, with real world examples, on specific issues.
Publishers Weekly

The heart of the matter for Thomas Sowell (Basic Economics) is to ask, "What are the facts?" In his latest book, economist Sowell examines numerous misconceptions about life and economics. Sowell writes like an exacting scholar, but his arguments, which rely on economic analyses primarily, may suffer from oversimplification. Sowell argues that zoning restrictions and rent-control policies hurt those whom they're meant to help; intones that women earn less than men because they are far less likely than men to choose occupations that require very long hours; believes tenure helps neither students nor professors; demonstrates that even the poor have successfully moved up economically; tackles fallacies about race in America; and aims to convince that "there is nothing baffling or morally wrong about the fact that different nations have different per capita incomes." He falters in his chapter on the academy, when he becomes an advocate rather than an observer, and oddly neglects the individual choice available to students. Sowell's purpose is to teach readers to "examine [their] beliefs more closely and more analytically," and the conclusions he draws are certain to inspire rigorous debate. This readable volume is a useful primer exposing how economics relates to the social issues that affect our country. (Jan.)
Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
-
Size: 316.82 MB  
Download this torrent

Extra information
Tracker: http://inferno.demonoid.com:3393/announce
Last seeder activity: 4 months ago
Files described inside the torrent: 21 [ Click here to show the full list ]
Comments
<< Prev      Next >>
| 1 - 5 |
Posted by Ratio: 0.93tgbyhn989 4 years ago [ Complain ] [ Send PM ]
Thank you !
Posted by Ratio: 0.34XGrinder 4 years ago [ Complain ] [ Send PM ]
Thanks !
Posted by Ratio: 2.32hollybegin 4 years ago [ Complain ] [ Send PM ]
Thank you very much......


You stay on your side and I'll stay on mine
You take what you want and I'll take the sunshine
sudlowPosted by Ratio: 1.07spookei 4 years ago [ Complain ] [ Send PM ]
Thankyou kindly!
Posted by Ratio: 0.50srk1979 2 years ago [ Complain ] [ Send PM ]
Smashing, thanks!
| 1 - 5 |
<< Prev      Next >>



Disclaimer: .None of the files shown here are actually hosted or transmitted by this server. The links are provided solely by this site's users. The site moderation is also a service provided by the site's users. The administrator of this site (demonoid.ph) cannot be held responsible for what its users post, or any other actions of its users. You may not use this site to distribute or download any material when you do not have the legal rights to do so. It is your own responsibility to adhere to these terms.

By using this site you indicate your agreement to our terms and conditions
   
Link to us | Contact us | Feeds/RSS | DMCA
This site and the Demonoid logo are Copyright © 2014 Demonoid. All rights reserved.

bitcoin: 1DNoidHyfiJxAWCuGfuEXFm9eLnXB2K98m